Righteousness

Romans 6:15-23 Know Consider Present - Jeff Coleman

Jeff addresses the problem of overcoming sin in our daily walk and the remedy provided in Romans Ch 6. We have to deal everyday with the temptation of whether to put the interest of ourselves before others. Now that we are saved from the penalty of sin, what do we do about the nagging problem of daily temptation and sin in our Christian life?

Rom 6:15-23 What God says to us about overcoming the temptation to sin in our daily Christian life.

Are we to sin? Sin leading to death or obedience leading to righteousness.

We have capacity of Knowing, Considering, and Presenting in battle of daily death to sin

Knowing is the first step in overcoming sin in our daily battle. Know about our identity in Christ

Know with our head.

Consider with your heart

Present with your hand.

Positionally, we have been set free from the old sin master. We have already won in Christ. Positionally, the sin master no longer has a rightful claim on your service.

1.       Know about your position in Christ when we believe. Knowing and counting it to be true is part of the victory we have in Christ.

2.       Consider, calculate, contemplate your identity and come to the right answer of who we really are in Christ. We are new creations in Christ. Considering our identity is the second step in overcoming sin.

3.       Stop presenting yourselves to sin but cut it off. Stop presenting your members to sin as tools for unrighteousness but present yourselves to God as one who has been brought from death to life.

It is still possible for a believer to present members of our body, our thoughts, our tongue, to sin. We struggle with this daily Instead, present ourselves to God as instruments of righteousness.

All people are slaves to whom they obey. We have a choice to make on a daily basis who we are going to serve. Practically we can serve the old master even though positionally we are slaves to righteousness.

We must bring our practice in line with our position.

There is no neutral position. "It may be the Devil or it may be the Lord but you are going to have to serve somebody" Dylan

If you think you are just on neutral ground then you are in practice serving Satan. You are just not aware of it. Matt 12:30

Standard/(form, pattern) of teaching, v 17. The doctrine of grace that Paul and the Apostles taught from. When we hear the gospel we are delivered over to grace and it frees us from the god of this age and gives us a firm foundation. It instructs us how to live, and shapes and mould who we are. Not moulded to the world but shaped by good doctrine and teaching.

Romans 5:12-21 Whats under the cover - Ross P

Ross teaches through the Gospel and how sin entered the world through one man, Adam, but justification, free gift of righteousness comes through faith in the one Son of Man, Jesus Christ our Lord.

This is the righteousness of God revealed in Jesus.

The Gospel is the Good News about the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Messiah.

Romans 5:1-11 The bad, the good and really good - John W

John reads to us Romans 5:1-11 and asks three questions:

  • Does our faith measure up under oppression and persecution? Rom 5: 1-5

  • How do we know God loves us? evidence Rom 5: 6-8

  • Can we be sure we are saved from Gods wrath. Rom 5:9-11 Can we rely upon Jesus?

In considering this passage he also reflects upon the recent controversy generated by Israel Folau.
Is it hateful to give someone a warning? The truth is that it is hateful to be indifferent and to say nothing. The opposite of love is not hate but indifference. What John concludes though is that the message in Folau’s tweet wasn’t untrue but rather it is incomplete. The remedy needs to be given as well. He suggests the followup Tweet needs to be ‘For all have sinned including me, and fallen but the gift of god is eternal life in Jesus Christ our Lord’

Vs 1 says ‘Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ’'

The benefits of the righteousness we have in Christ when we believe is very good news.

  • We have peace with God; we have been reconciled.

  • We stand in Grace through whom we have access by faith

  • We can rejoice or boast in the hope of the glory of God

  • God has poured his love into our hearts; we are not separate or independent from God, He indwells us with His Holy Spirit.

  • We have been reconciled with God.

Romans 3:21-31 The best news ever - Simon

Powerpoint Download Rom 3:21-31 The Good news

The book of Romans is Paul carefully laying out his case (or his defence or apology) for his controversial ‘law-free’ gospel, a new way of understanding God and relating to Him.

Paul’s whole message is not about doing for or giving to God the right or righteous things, so that God will accept you, but it is about receiving the right things or righteousness from God. It is no longer about us being accepted by God because of what we do, but it is about being accepted by God because of what God does!

“But now apart from the law the righteousness of God has been made known, to which the Law and the Prophets testify.”
What is it?

Righteousness – defined as “the quality of being morally right or justifiable”. It means exactly what it sounds like: it is being right, or ‘right-being’, and making things right, as good as they can be, or ‘right-making’. It’s a word of status or position: that you are in the right, you’re in right and good standing with others. Another helpful way that I’ve heard it described is right-relatedness in all your relationships, with each other, with society, with God.

The Bad News: Up until this point, the way that God related to people was through the Law – the expression of who God is – through the Law, God shows his love, faithfulness, justice, to human beings. The Law showed human beings how to be God’s people, how to be righteous (in right relationship with God) and enters into a covenant-relationship with Israel. And Israel was then given the mission to show the rest of the world (the Gentile world) what God is like, who He is, and through the way they lived and followed God’s law. They were called to be a blessing to the nations, to point people back to their Creator.

But because of our sinfulness and brokenness, our rebellious hearts are unable to keep God’s laws faithfully. All through the story of the Bible, God’s people fail in their mission to be a light to the nations; they fail (as do we) to love God and to love neighbour. And the very law that was given to show us what God is like, also uncovers what we are like – it shows us the righteousness of God, but it also shows us our righteousness (or lack thereof). That why Paul says in v.

“For we have already made the charge that Jews and Gentiles alike are all under the power of sin. 10 As it is written: “There is no one righteous, not even one; 11 there is no one who understands; there is no one who seeks God. 12 All have turned away, they have together become worthless; there is no one who does good, not even one.”

Based on our record of righteousness, what hope do we have of being in relationship with God in the way that we were meant for? How can we live faithfully as His people, and show the world what He is like? 



The Good News: “But now”, God has revealed to us a new way of relating to Him, something that the entire Story has anticipated and waited for… God’s righteousness is being made known to us, put on full display for us to see, in a completely new and entirely unheard of way! God has intervened and revealed who He is, and has made Himself known to us. And this has always been part of the plan – all through the Story there have been signs, whispers and pointers preparing us for the this revelation, this unveiling of God, the curtain is about to rise.

“But now” – there are no more wonderful words in the whole of Scripture than just these two words. – Martin Lloyd-Jones (Examples: Romans 6:21-22; 7:5-6; 16:25-27; Eph 5:8; Col 1:21-22; 1 Peter 2:10; 2:25)

What is it? Who is it?

It’s Jesus – God’s righteousness revealed. God coming into our world to act in bringing people back into right relationship with Him, is done through the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

God’s Righteousness Given “This righteousness is given through faith in Jesus Christ to all who believe. There is no difference between Jew or Gentile, for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and all are justified (declared righteous) freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.”

How we receive it: Through faith The news gets even better. Paul goes on to say that this righteousness of God that has now been revealed to us in Christ is given to us. Given to us.

God’s righteousness is given through faith in Jesus Christ. To all who believe. We receive God’s gracious gift of God’s righteousness with the hands of faith and hearts that believe.

It means that Jesus Christ is the object of our faith and belief. We place the full weight of our trust, hope and belief in Him, and what He has done.

“The man who has faith is the man who is no longer looking at himself, and no longer looking to himself. He no longer looks at anything he once was. He does not look at what he is now. He does not look at what he hopes to be … He looks entirely to the Lord Jesus Christ and his finished work, and he rests on that alone.” (Romans Chapters 3:20 – 4:25, page 45) – Martin Lloyd-Jones

The Bad News: We have all of us, fallen short of the glory of God, no matter who you are. On the basis of our own records of righteousness, none of us have a case. Because we are all of us under the power of sin, and we have all missed the mark, we cannot share in the glory of God, to be in right relationship with him, in the unrighteous state that you and I are in.

The Good News: But now, all, anyone, everyone who puts their faith in Jesus Christ, can receive God’s righteousness; it is given to you, God’s righteousness in place of yours! V. 24 says that we are justified and redeemed, freely by the work of Jesus.

1) We are justified – the word used is the same word for ‘righteousness’, and so when we are justified by God, it means that God declares us ‘righteous’! Justification is a word used in the courtroom. When two parties come for a trial, what they are there to do is to make their case before the court, and the judge decides who is right. Who is righteous, who is justified. And so when we are justified, it means that God looks at us and declares us righteous. Why? More on that later.


2) We are redeemed – the word ‘redemption’ means “to liberate by paying a price”. Our freedom has been “bought back”. We are now free from our bondage to sin and death because we have been freed by the work of Christ on the cross.

The Problem: How can God remain righteous—maintain a perfect record of being just and always doing what is right—and make sinners, who deserve justice, righteous? Or to put it differently, how can there be a righteousness of God and a righteousness from God?

How can a just God justify justifying sinners like you and me?

We long for a world free of sin, brokenness, and evil, and long for a world of love, freedom and peace. We live in a world where so much has gone wrong, and we keep trying to find a way to fix it. But we are all contributors to the evil and sin and brokenness that we see in the world – we are both victims and perpetrators of crimes against humanity.

So how does God deal with the sin and brokenness of this world, as he should in his justice, while showing his love, grace and mercy to justify and redeem humanity? How can a just God justify justifying sinners like you and me? How does God remain righteous – true to His characteristic of justice and love, without compromising on either?

Paul tells us exactly how God does this.

We get now to the heart of the Christian faith – the deeper you go, the more beautiful it becomes, and I hope you see it too. Right at the heart of the Christian faith, is Christ himself.

“God presented Christ as a sacrifice of atonement, through the shedding of his blood…”

Atonement – what does that mean? A clue is in the word itself – it is the act of “at-one-ment” – to reunite, to repair, to recompense, to repay, to reconcile, to make right what was wrong, to bring back together (into one) what had been split apart. Atonement is what it takes to make things whole again, to make things right again.

Demonstration of God’s Righteousness – How is the work of Christ demonstration of God’s righteousness?

On the cross, God’s glory and righteousness are displayed in their clearest definition. 4K HD, it does not get much clearer than that.

It is the place where God’s justice and love meet. At the cross, God Himself, shows us the full extent of His righteousness – divine justice and divine love shown completely in the cross of Christ.

“If God forgave us by becoming indifferent to sin—if the only way he could justify his people was to give up his role as Judge—then that would hardly be loving to the victims of sin, it would give us no assurance for the future, and would make God deeply compromised within his character. No, God should, must, and will judge us. The wonder is that he judged us in the person of his own Son; that, as John Murray writes:

“God loved the objects of his wrath so much that he gave his own Son to the end that he by his blood should make provision for the removal of his wrath.” (The Atonement, page 15)

God does not set his justice aside; he turns it onto himself. The cross does not represent a compromise between God’s wrath and his love; it does not satisfy each halfway. Rather, it satisfies each fully and in the very same action. On the cross, the wrath and love of God were both vindicated, both demonstrated, and both expressed perfectly. They both shine out, and are utterly fulfilled. The cross is a demonstration both of God’s justice, and of his justifying love.”

This is why Paul says that God is both just and justifier of those who have faith and who put their trust in Jesus Christ.

The heart of the gospel is this: That you and I are so flawed, so unrighteous, so sinful, rebellious and broken before God, that it took nothing less that the death of Jesus Christ to atone for my sins to save me, but you and I are so loved and valued and cherished by God that Jesus did it. He did it! He was glad to do it. Justice and love.

If you’ve never heard the gospel before perhaps this is all new to you, and you’ve never heard about God like this before. Maybe you feel far away or distant from him. God and me? Nah, it can’t be. The news may sound good, but maybe it’s just a little too good. Too good to be true.

Which do you struggle with? God’s justice? Maybe you think, ‘why should God have to judge’? Why does he have to punish sin? Why can’t God just forgive us without punishing sin? Why can’t God just be loving?

I could love a God of love and grace and compassion, but when I think about the anger and the wrath of God, and how he has to deal with sin, that doesn’t make me want to love him at all!

Well, dear brother or sister, there is good news for you. Do you know what the opposite of love is? The opposite of love isn’t hate. The opposite of love is indifference.

“If God was indifferent to sin, we would actually feel no real love at all. We (rightly) hear a lot about abusive, overbearing parents who do not show love to their children. But completely permissive parents who set no limits, give no guidance, and never confront their children are also unloving, and also destructive. The world is full of people raised with a supposedly enlightened view of a “loving,” “anything-goes” God, so they feel spiritually like orphans with no certainty or real love, because they are. They have ended up with a God who is uncaring and indifferent; and, of course, non-existent.”

God is concerned about justice because he cares about this world. He is not indifferent, he is not unloving. He is deeply concerned about sin, because in his holiness and perfect righteousness, he is deeply concerned about us, about this world. And it is His justice and righteousness that makes him a God we can depend on, a God that is worthy of our devotion and worship.

Maybe you struggle with God’s love? Maybe you are aware of your record. No one knows the things you have done, how broken you really are. If God knew what was on my record – He would want nothing to do with me, let alone be in relationship with me?

Maybe all you feel is that weight of God’s judgement, and you know that’s all that could be waiting for you. God is going to judge me, just like everyone else has. A holy and righteous God could never love me.

There is very good news for you. God knows exactly what you’ve done, he knows you, better than you know yourself. He knows everything about you – and you know what? He loves you anyway. He knows you’re deserving of judgement – we all are. That why Jesus came, to live the life you should have lived, and dies the death you should have died. He bears the full weight of God’s judgement so that you and I don’t have to.

If you put your trust, your hope, your faith in Jesus Christ and what he has done for you, God looks at you, standing on the dock, and he declares you “righteous”. He looks at you, and he sees the righteousness of his beloved Son, Jesus, that you have received through faith in Jesus. He looks at you, with the eyes of a loving Father looking at His beloved child.

This is the best news you will ever hear.

Romans 3:5-20 The effects of sin - John W

PowerPoint Download Romans 3:5-20

Rom 1-3, how God deals with the question of sin.

How has it affected NZ?

March 15, 2019, the Christchurch mosque killing was probably the most violent act ever experienced in NZ. Why did it happen. Why did the gunman hate the victims so much? Where is the justice?

Why are there so many reports of sexual abuse and unreported cases of violence on young men and women in hostel care at university when they should expect to be safe?

Why do people have no respect for the goods of others and steal the goods of others meant to bring wellness and happiness. 

This post Christian NZ, 2019. Have you ever felt angry because of someone else’s sin? Have you felt bullied or threatened? Do you feel safe? If someone in your family was innocently killed would you be angry? But John asks whether we have ever been burdened or upset at our own sin. About habits you cannot break. Lying, stealing, ignoring the needs of others. Have you ever wanted a second chance to put things right? Have you ever sought forgiveness or wept over your sin?

Would the world be a better place if you could put right the things that are wrong?

How do we deal with sin? Intellectually we try and deny it exists but practically we spend vast sums of money to counter its effects with police, defence, secret service, and hospitals because we have to live a world that is safe.

How does God deal with sin? In the first three chapters of Romans, God gives the treatment that all have sinned and the next 5 chapters He gives the treatment. Eternal life in Christ Jesus. The wages of sin is death but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ.

Romans 1 tells us that the natural man is controlled by sin. Chapter 2, the moral person fails to meet their own standards. You have no excuse you who pass judgement on someone else. The speck on in your brother’s eye is not as severe as the plank in your own eye. Both you and your brother have a problem, but we tend to look past our own failings and amplify the failures of others.

By taking reflection on our own failings we learn to be more understanding and sensitive to the needs of others.

Rom 3:5 tells us that sin effects the whole person, even our reasoning ability. If our falsehood enhances God's glory, then why don’t we just sin more to make God look even better. An illogical argument because it favours us. We want to replace truth with clever arguments and finish up arguing that the exact opposite true. God shouldn’t be angry with us because we somehow make God look better. But God will judge the world.

Rom 3:8 let us just do evil that good may result? Illogical. But we also argue that we don’t have to do demonstrate our faith by good works, or we can continue to live in sin so that grace may increase. Flawed, self-interested arguments. We have died to sin so how can we continue to live in it?

A principle of living a righteous living is deciding to die to sin. When we accepted Jesus, we made a decision to die to sin. When we think and talk about our sin, we are not neutral parties. We distort the facts. We need to listen to what God says and understand his righteousness is that we have a correct view of our sin.

All Jews and Gentiles are under the power of sin because no one can keep God's standards. There is no one righteous. No one who understands. No one with a character of moral excellence. No one who completely desires to search out God. No one who never sins.

We are all created in the image of God and can do good things but no one is immune from the stain of sin and our heart motivation is short of God's holiness.

The sin impacts all aspects of our life. The way of peace we do not know. What we say, what we do, what we think. It leads to speech that destroys others, the poison of a viper, cursing and bitterness. Destructive speech is quick to become destructive actions. Sin makes false promises of peace and never delivers. War and conflict continue dominate the world. We have no fear of God before our eyes and the mindset of sin is to remove God from our thought, thinking we can live independent of Him.

The solution for sin does not come from within but only by an intervention from God to provide a different type of righteousness, the righteousness of God.

The good news of Romans is that God will share His righteousness with us.

Matthew 23: What Grieves the heart of God - John W

John reviews the Gospel of Matthew up to the conflict scene with the Pharisees, starting in Chapter 21. The message examines the things that grieves the heart of God through the lens of Jesus. Specifically chapter Matt:23 challenges us on actions that:

1. Closes the door to God's Kingdom, v. 13
2. Leading people away from God to be people like the Pharisees, v. 15
3. Following man-made traditions instead of God's Word, v. 16-22
4. Concentrating on the minutia (legalism) and ignoring what is really important; Justice, Mercy and faithfulness, v.23-24
5. Putting on an act so that you look 'right', v.25-26
6. Not addressing the evil on the inside, v.27-28
7. Rejecting and murdering God's prophets and messengers, v.29-36
 

Matthew 5:21-48 : God's Righteousness - Geoffrey S

Matthew records Jesus' challenge to the religious leaders that the righteousness of God does not come from doing right but being right. To be in a right relationship with God through the forgiveness offered in Jesus Christ, and right relationships with people as peace makers and being pure in thought and action.

These passages cover our ugly characteristics of Anger, Lust, Adultery, Divorce, Dishonesty and Retaliation.

Recognizing the depth of God's great love for us and His ability to work in the midst of our frailty can enable us to count on Him to change our hearts, to have hope that He can transform us to be more like his Son.

We can count on Him to transform our hearts because this is who God is. The gospel is the story of God wooing and loving us, His enemies. He cared for us before we even knew or cared that He existed. Transforming conflict into peace and well-being is at the heart of who He is. 

It is God who continually accomplishes the impossible--of enabling us to love, when our natural man only knows anger and division. 

Christ has covered only 6 principles here: Do not express hatred for another, but do good to everyone no matter what they did to you. Do nothing sexually immoral. Stay with the one you are married to. Do not break any commitments you make. Do not rebel against any authority, even evil ones. 

These are not laws that we can just wake up one day and say, “Well, it’s illegal to do this, so I think I’ll just stop.” Rather, these are laws that must begin to be obeyed in our minds. Our thoughts are what determine what our small, seeming insignificant actions will be. Thus, we must depend on the Spirit of God to obey in this way.

Matthew 3 - John the Baptist - Ross P

Matthew 3 introduces John the Baptist

  • John's Message
    In those days John the Baptist came. His message is REPENT.
    What does repent mean, …sorry?  Means to change your mind about yourself, God and Jesus.

Repentance makes you realise you are not as good as another and when you compare yourself with God everyone must repent but its hard. We instead admit regret or remorse or apologise. Things didn’t work out the way you meant it to. Repentance is a total change of mind. We must repent of our attitude toward God. Repentance gives us a glimpse of the holiness of God. Repentance shows in our behaviour.

  • His Mandate, his authority. The voice of one calling in the desert, Isaiah. Scripture spoke of him as the messenger
  • Manner, very unconventional. What he wore or what he ate.
  • Menace or challenge or warning. John was not a guy you could be comfortable with. You need to show evidence. You brood of vipers. Today would be considered hate speech. He condemned the religious leaders. You need to produce fruit. Religious heritage cannot save you. Just because Abraham was their father this will not save you. Wrath that is coming.  God’s judgment on this world is still coming. The wrath of God was satisfied on the cross.
    Saying these things does not win friends or make you popular.
  • Motive. Pointing to the Lord Jesus who is coming after him. Not even willing to carry Jesus sandals.

Baptism of the Holy Spirit. Spread to all God’s people. We are baptised into the body of Christ by the Holy Spirit. Brought into one fellowship. If you know Jesus Christ as your personal saviour then you are baptised into the body of Christ with the HS.
With Fire. Like tongues of fire. Fire refers to judgment. Chafe and wheat, one is for burning and one is for storing away. Judgment on the world has not come yet but it will come.

Johns motive was to point to the Lord Jesus Christ. He must increase but I must decrease. I want to magnify the Lord Jesus.
Do this to be seen to be right. To fulfil all righteousness. Sometimes we need prompting to do the right thing.

  • Message one of repentance.
  • Mandate was the scripture
  • Manner was unconventional
  • Menace: Show the evidence, don’t just say it
  • Motive: to point to Jesus
  • Moment: when he saw the heavens opened.

What is our message? Repentance toward God, faith in Jesus Christ. Many people believe they are Christians because they believe only. So too do the demons believe. I’m not going to change. Both are essential. Repentance toward God and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ

Mandate: Jesus said go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature. Tell the good news. You can be saved from the coming wrath through Him.

Manner: by all means to save some

Motive: we always point to the Lord Jesus Christ, we don’t point to ourselves. He wants us to be more and more conformed to the Lord Jesus Christ. Is Christ magnified in your life more now than last year?

Moment: What was your moment when you were acutely aware of God revealing himself to you. When sis God speak with clarity into your heart? When have you passed from death into life.

What happened to John? He became less popular. I must decrease. Spoke out about Herod’s adultery. Herod got mad and jailed him. Even if you had your moment, like John, you begin to have doubts. Health changes, lose your job. Matthew 11 records he questions whether Christ is the one. Doubt still happens. John was told that people were being raised to life and the scriptures taught. Jesus said that of men born to women John the Baptist was the greatest. Jesus said the least person was greater than he. John was the best man. the bridegroom. The most important on the day. The least person in the kingdom. 

We have the privilege of being united to Christ in the way the bride is to the bridegroom. Sad end. What happens to the messenger happened to the Master? Rejected, Crucified. 

An example for us in our Christian lives where Christ increases and magnified in our lives. The we might be hidden in him.

Isaiah Introduction - Why Prophecy? : Ross P

Ross introduces the teaching series and book of Isaiah and asks why should we study prophecy since it is often associated with controversy and unpopular judgement. Prophecy constitutes at least 25% of the bible so to not study prophecy is to overlook a large portion of God's word.
6 Reasons to study prophecy:

  1. It Promotes scripture. All scripture is profitable.
  2. It Prevents ignorance. It informs us of God's plan and confirms already fulfilled promises
  3. It Proclaims Christ. Rev 19:10 'the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy' All prophecy points to Christ
  4. It Promises personal benefit. Rev 1:3
  5. It Promotes holy living. 2 Pet 3:10
  6. It Persuades people into sharing the good news knowing that God's judgement is assured in the future as it was demonstrated in the past. 2 Cor 5:10 'we will all give account to God'

The message concludes with a call to repentance.